For over 30 years, the D.C. Behavioral Health Association has sought to expand and improve community-based behavioral health services through policy advocacy and staff development.  Our 42 members are the providers who offer services ranging from substance abuse and mental health treatment to housing supports for adults or children in foster care.  Every year, our members serve over 24,000 D.C. residents -- helping them find peace, recovery and resilience.  

 

Learn more about our members' work and the D.C. Behavioral Health Association's activities through the links on the left-hand side of this page. 

 

Recent News

  • Back by Popular Demand: Negotiating with Health Plans Health reform means that behavioral health providers can expand their services to Medicaid and commercial health plans. This training will help mental health providers understand the full range of services ...
    Posted Jul 11, 2014, 5:47 AM by DC Behavioral Health Association
  • Passive Enrollment Webinar, July 17 On July 17, the D.C. Department of Health Care Finance will host a webinar explaining the new procedures required to transition to passive enrollment. Every Medicaid provider needs to ...
    Posted Jul 11, 2014, 5:43 AM by DC Behavioral Health Association
  • Registration Open for June 5th Conference The behavioral health community is tasked today with operationalizing health reform, and our conference is an opportunity for you to master new skills required in the post-ACA landscape.   Our ...
    Posted Apr 16, 2014, 1:02 PM by DC Behavioral Health Association
  • Corporate Compliance in the Era of Extrapolation Federal law requires that providers train their Boards of Directors about Medicaid compliance. Auditors will look at corporate infrastructure for risk management when evaluating your program. In the era of ...
    Posted Mar 4, 2014, 1:18 PM by DC Behavioral Health Association
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The D.C. Behavioral Health Association is the policy voice for providers to support adopting and implementing these successful changes to community-based behavioral health services for the city's low-income population.